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18

I have had this need myself (though not to cover an acre) and I eventually got tired of the horrendously poor capabilities offered by ISP devices. Now, rather than using the WiFi settings of those devices, I turn WiFi off completely on the ISP device and use a separate router. Once you have configured your own router to your liking, it is completely plug &...


10

I would recommend getting WRT400N It's trending around $15 and you might be even able to negotiate down further. www.ebay.com/itm/172094577410 These are Dual-Band wireless-N Routers, so you can use one band just for bridging between your main router and second band can be used for extending the signal further Yes, it will pass the signal to wired networks ...


9

I use OpenELEC on a dedicated computer, and have also set it up for a friend on a Raspberry Pi (Raspberry Pi 2 is highly recommended as the extra processing ability makes a big difference). It is a distribution based around Kodi, a home theatre software system. It is designed to "just work", and doesn't require any knowledge of Linux or coding to use. It ...


7

Purpose-built Linux distros have gotten very user-friendly in recent years. You can use a Raspberry Pi with HiFi audio running RuneAudio. No coding or even any Linux command-line required. If your friend doesn't want to do the small amount of tinkering to assemble the hardware and install the OS, maybe it's something you would have fun doing, and perhaps ...


5

I used to use one of these to serve as a wireless receiver for a machine that only had an ethernet port. TP-LINK-TL-WR702N-Wireless-Repeater In addition to serving as a "wireless card" for my device it also could have been configured to serve as an access point, a repeater and a few other functions. Once I got it configured it worked well and never gave me ...


5

Based on your picture, and description involving "U" and "Q", it sounds like you are thinking of a product from Ubiquiti Networks. There was a very detailed article about them on Ars Technica last October. The only issue is, they don't have have a router that looks similar to your image. There are Access Points though. One of the ones that Ars reviewed was ...


5

I've a fair amount of experience with homeplug - I'm not going to recommend specific models since I have no clue if the sinoji plugs I use are available elsewhere or are the best option outside my current market. Wirecutter seems to like zyxel at the moment and are a good place for up to date reviews. I'd suggest getting homeplug 500 or better gear if you ...


4

Looks like you've got some interference somewhere. This can happen for a variety of reasons. Bad placement of router Radio waves cannot easily travel through granite and other certain materials walls are made of, and your WiFi signal could suffer from degradation if your walls are made of one of these materials. A solution to this would be one (or more) of ...


4

I personally have yet to find a better component for this job than the Gigabyte GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter. Native linux support at least in debian/ubuntu AC/N/G support PCI-E 2.0 1x (probably the single best balance between performance and compatibility of any interface type) Good performance reviews Half-height compatible ...


4

One option is Particle (f.k.a. Spark) Photon - STM32F205 ARM Cortex M3 microcontroller with Broadcom BCM43362 Wi-Fi module, 1MB flash, 128KB RAM for $19. Second option is WiFiMCU - STM32F411CE ARM Cortex M4 microcontroller with Broadcom Wi-Fi module, 2MB SPI flash, 512KB on-chip flash, 128KB RAM for $10. Another option is a much cheaper NodeMCU - ESP8266 ...


4

Gargoyle provides exactly what you are looking for. You did not indicate what requirements you had for speed but I would guess that lack of AC Compatibility would not be a deal breaker being how much the overages cost. Gargoyle offers a router that is pre-loaded with their firmware. Link to Product The cost is currently $85.00 Specifications: 802.11 B/G/...


4

I found the EnGenius ENS202 N300 on Newegg. This is a brand of wireless equipment this is designed for outdoor use. It rated up to 158 degrees. It's also water resistant with an IP55 rating, meanint its resistant to dust and low pressure water from all angles. If this model doesn't cut it for you, this company makes a wide range of outdoor rated ...


4

Since you like Ubiquiti (I love 'em) why not use their "In Wall" WiFi Access Point? What I like about this solution is that it does exactly what you are looking to do all in one box: Wifi Access Point PoE & Data Passthrough port for a VoIP phone, camera, etc. Standard Data port The best part is, it goes into a standard wall or surface mount jack for a ...


4

You can get any of the routers which support the Tomato Open-source Router Firmware. This firmware includes in it the Transmission BitTorrent client which can do just about anything torrent... I'd recommend specifically the AdvancedTomato breed of the Tomato firmware which improves a lot in the UI and looks of it. Here is a list of routers it is available ...


4

The "routers" that are available via the retail channel are not suitable for high demand type applications. Additionally, you said that you already had a "router" that acted as a DHCP server so there's no point in getting another one. All your need is a wireless access point or WAP. I use the Ubiquiti UniFi AC Pro, not only for my clients, but in my ...


4

Routers and WiFi devices have to undergo certification to have the "WiFi" branding. Any router that does not have a 2.4 Ghz radio would not be backwards compatible with IEEE 802.11 b/g/n and may not qualify for the "WiFi" branding. I have never seen a "WiFi" router with only a 5 Ghz radio. But you can disable the 2.4 Ghz radio in many routers though. It is ...


3

All of GL.iNet routers are based on OpenWRT. You can get the GL-AR150 for $25 which is a pretty nice device with 16MB Flash ROM, 64MB RAM and 1 USB port. Also, you could go for some cheap TP-LINK routers like TL-WR741N or TL-WR841N which have OpenWRT support.


3

For development it is a good idea to get a high-end phone. The nexus 5x is a high-end phone for a great price. It has a front facing speaker, 5.2 inch display with a 1920x1080 resolution. The CPU is a Snapdragon 808 and has 2GB of RAM. The phone is running android 6.0 and will continue to get updates for the next 2 years. A good reason to get a nexus for ...


3

These are the two routers which match your requirements and these were released recently. These are tri-band routers which do not reduce speed even when multiple devices are connected to the same network i.e A tri-band router is literally hosting two separate 5 GHz networks, and it automatically sorts devices into different networks. This offers more speed ...


3

Most microcontroller boards less than $20 do not have Bluetooth/Wifi/Eth, or LCD ports. The Raspberry Pi is your best bet, but if you need something a bit cheaper with the same capabilities, I'd look at the PINE A64, Currently on pre-order. $15 gets you: -64bit Quad Core ARM A53 1.2GHz CPU -512MB DDR3 SDRAM -MicroSD Slot Supports up to 256GB -10/100 Mb ...


3

I recently decided to build my own wireless router - and I found the Airetos AEX-QCA9880-NX performing very well on my DIY machine: 3 channels 802.11ac/n/g in a miniPCIe shape.


3

For those looking for a Weather station with an API i found some (not ordered): 1) Ambient Weather JSON Formatted Data Connection secured by key Lot of weather stations (from $100 to $1000) 2) WeatherFlow Smart Home Weather Station REST API and local data access via UDP and BLE Solar powered AI / Machine learning improves forecasts over time (someone has ...


3

The big issue you're going to run into is the need for a hotspot. While there are still recycled and cheap phones made by one or two manufacturers which possess the other features, it's very rare for any of them to also serve as a hotspot. They are considered entry-level phones and usually use a proprietary operating system so everything "looks like the ...


2

Industrial: Cisco offers products with this capability: 4G Routers. I have used their products to build similar configurations. There are many industrial products like this from Cisco and others. They can meet all of your requirements but they are quite pricey. Consumer: Here is a product that is built to act as a backup to a DSL modem and stand between ...


2

From a pure numbers standpoint, the Hiro's 5dBi antenna beats the Panda's 2dBi antenna, and both beat the Netgear's tiny on-board antenna, so it's likely the Hiro will give you the best reception of the three. You don't specify your budget, but it looks like about $20-ish. If you're willing to go up to $30, the Alfa AWUS036NH has a powerful transmitter ...


2

Hostapd is hard to set up if you don't know what you are doing. I've had the same issue, I just couldn't make it work so I searched and found this beautiful script called create_ap. It can create a wifi network with a single command. If that still doesn't work, you can buy some travel router (for example TP-LINK TL-WR710N, it is the first thing I found) and ...


2

I chatted with rep from four-faith.com and they said I can buy from them. At worst I can enter into another chat to make the purchase happen. The model http://en.four-faith.com/f3a36h-mediawifioperating-marketingrouter.html seems best for my needs: 9 to 36 Volts DC 128GB SSD installed 3G / 4G IEEE 802.11b/g/n Update: Price - US$506 shipped. If I was ...


2

What a coincidence, I've also got a RPi Zero. Check this out on Amazon.com, "Edimax EW-7811Un 150Mbps 11n Wi-Fi USB Adapter" It's only $8.99. It says it's compatible with RPi and RPi 2. I personally have the wifi dongle that came with the adafruit RPi Zero Starter Pack (which is about $11 w/o shipping). Hope this is helpful :D


2

Personally, I would spend the time and do a proper CAT5e/6 installation; meaning running cable in/through the walls, terminating properly, hiding the network gear so it's out of sight. The benefit of being directly connected is the reliability of the connection is so much greater than that of WiFi. But... If you want to go wireless, I would forgo the USB ...


2

Check this board "atmega328" with serial port around $2 / without serial port $1.5 on aliexpress A wireless shield will cost you around 1.5$ also on aliexpress Or this little guy ESP8266 the newer one for $1.70 Here is a project about ESP8266 RFID reader around $1.70, 6 DATA PINS and 2 for VCC, GND from here


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