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11

After some more research, I hardly founds anything. The hard part with this search is the RAM - most that meet your specs are workstations or gaming laptops, both of which tend to be large. That said, I did find ONE laptop that seems to meet your requirements: (Disclaimer: I have not used any of the products or laptops mentioned here) MSI GS40 It is small: ...


9

The classic device for low-power Linux usage is the Raspberry Pi. Either the model 1 B+ or the model 2 B will meet your needs: 4 USB ports, can run headless just fine, is about the size of a deck of cards, and draws about 3W.


8

With these fairly low requirements, any of the mid-range ARM boards would fit, so you might as well go for a Raspberry Pi by default. (Model 2, the earlier models aren't worth the slightly lower price.) The reference price for just the board is $35, plus a power supply gets you 4 USB2 ports (keyboard, mouse, external drive, 1 spare or wifi) 100 MB Ethernet ...


7

I did some testing with a Radeon 5770. In my judgment, it's massive overkill for your uses, but since you're worried about performance, overkill is good. You don't mention what you're doing with WebGL, so I tested it by activating compositing and then running a few pages from a Google search for "WebGL benchmark". Everything performed smoothly. Now, the ...


7

There are a variety of notebooks that are capable of running Linux, and some even have it pre-installed by the manufacturer: Dell XPS 13- Developer edition A lightweight notebook, but its 13.3" screen size may be too large for you. It does however come with Ubuntu 14.04 pre-installed, so hardware support for Linux is 100%. It's a bit on the pricey side ...


7

TL;DR: Ryzen, unless you plan on never, ever touching this computer after building it. Let's take a quick look at the advantages/disadvantages: Ryzen | FX –––––––––––––––––––|––––––––––––––––––– Performance | Performance/$ Platform | Platform cost Upgrade path | Performance While I'm having ...


6

The problem with those kinds of USB devices is that it's very difficult to know what chip they are actually using. Some devices in the same series might even use different components if the manufacturer was able to source a slightly different component at a cheaper price. They would then ship a Windows driver that supports the different variations of ...


6

I think you are making this overly complex. I purchased a Kindle Fire for my 80 year old aunt and showed her how to use three apps on it. Netflix, Skype and email. The out of pocket cost was just over $50 including the case and a stand (so she could watch movies) I positioned the icons for her so that they were the first things that were there when the ...


5

Dell recently came out with the Latitude E7270 series which seems ideal. Small and lightweight, 14" or smaller, no more than 2224 grams 12,5" display, starts at 1260 grams. Linux support (I don't mind if it comes with Windows but every hardware component should work well under Linux too.) They come with Windows 7/10 but we have good experience ...


5

I've recommended it before but I'll recommend it again (and no, I swear I'm not an Acer employee): the Acer Aspire E1-572. It's a little over your specs in some ways, but it's a good laptop, especially for the price. i3/i5 (in newer versions) quad core 1.7 GHz 8 GB DDR3L RAM 1 TB internal HDD Removable/replaceable battery (handy for being away from power ...


5

I recently bought a HP storage works x1400 from eBay for $50 including shipping. HP storage works x1400 is based on HP DL320 so if you search ebay you can look for DL320 G6 Specs quad core cpu Takes 4 3.5 drives it came with 4 500gb disks You can replace these with your own high capacity drives I think 2TB might be upper limit not sure if there is a way ...


5

Personally, I would just go with a raspberry pi, more specifically, the RPi 3 Model B Along with a USB wifi dongle such as this. Cost totals out to about $49 USD ($40 for the RPi and $9 for the wifi dongle). RPi's are capable of running 24/7, as mentioned here. The main reasons why I would prefer a RPi are: It is cheaper, compared to the other options ...


4

Sandisk Extreme is a good mix of budget and speed. smaller size is better performance on these devices Sandisk Extreme USB Benchmark Links Like This are fairly reliable sources for your consumer research purposes


4

If you are willing to try a new keyboard layout Truly Ergonomic makes a mechanical keyboard that is structured oddly. It is suppose to be better for you than the standard keyboards (during long term use) and they have different key switch options. It should also be noted that this keyboard does not have a keypad, if you find yourself using the keypad a lot ...


4

I personally have yet to find a better component for this job than the Gigabyte GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter. Native linux support at least in debian/ubuntu AC/N/G support PCI-E 2.0 1x (probably the single best balance between performance and compatibility of any interface type) Good performance reviews Half-height compatible ...


4

See the following articles from Phoronix: 30-Way Graphics Card Comparison On Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS 15-Way AMD/NVIDIA Graphics Card Comparison For 4K Linux Gaming The Best, Most Efficient Graphics Cards For 1080p Linux Gamers In fact there are a dozen more articles comparing video cards on Phoronix, and you can use that to decide how much you want to spend ...


4

For programming the most botlenecking happens, when the content of RAM gets dumped to pagefile. So the priority should be at least 8 GB of RAM (especially with VMs - if you ran two, 16GB would be better), next the SSD - in my experience, the processor does not bottleneck while programming as much as IO operations. I would consider Lenovo B50-80 family of ...


4

Anything with DisplayPort 1.2 or better, eg Intel NUC NUC6i5SYH or NUC6i3SYK. DisplayPort daisy-chaining allows for up to 5 monitors connected to a single DP socket.


4

You could buy a fanless Chromebook and install linux yourself. It shouldn't be that difficult if you have much Linux experience, which you probably do if you only want it for the command line.


4

The HP Stream 13 might be a good option. I've run Fedora on the older, bay trail 11-inch model and it works out of the box. You may need to turn off secure boot for some distros. Otherwise? Dual core Celeron processor (mine was bay trail but there's a newer model), fanless, roughly 6-hour battery life, 32GB eMMC for storage, and it's entirely silent.


4

There's apparently NUC style passively cooled machines meant for displays that would work. Discourse uses something very similar internally I've been toying with buying one of these and it probably ticks off most of your boxes - intel ethernet, and 4 ports (realtek's a pain). I've run linux on a very similar platform. With the right variant, you got USB 3....


4

I've had good luck with MiniDSP products for this. For example: https://www.minidsp.com/products/usb-audio-interface/mchstreamer


3

Apple MacBook Pro 13-inch with Retina display Positive: Available in Germany Works with OS X and Linux 1649€ with the specs you want 8 GB DDR3 RAM 256 GB SSD (really fast: over 1.5 GB/s read and write) 1.58 kg 10 hours of web surfing 2560x1600 display 13.3-inch screen Wi-Fi ac (over 1.3 Gbit/s; I have tested it myself) Silent under normal workload D-SUB/...


3

I've had good success with the following card on Mac: Diamond VC500 It has Linux support as well according to the link, but I have not tested it. Here are the specifications: USB 2.0 Supports NTSC and PAL Captures Composite RCA or S-Video input 640 x 480 @30FPS NTSC video capture 720 x 576 @25FPS PAL video capture Included Software: Videoglide for Mac OS, ...


3

I would not use wireless because wireless will be too erratic performance for your need. Instead, use a couple of POE cameras, two long cat5 cables, two POE injectors and a switch or a POE switch, and a laptop to do the recording. All of this would run off a 150W inverter which can run off a car battery. Camera $100 NZ/each http://www.cdlnz.com/index....


3

English is not my native language so please be patient. At work we use the Raspberry Pi 2 (model B), this device meet all your especifications. There are many boards that may be suitable for your needs. You can check in http://www.bigboardlist.com for more options than Raspberry Pi. Almost all of them come with at least one USB and a Ethernet Port, the ...


3

From what other people have told me, the Microsoft Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 is one of the best keyboards that they have bought. This is a full sized keyboard, so it has a number pad and will not be as portable as a smaller keyboard. It does have media keys (play/pause, next, previous, and mute) as well. There are a few additional features that this ...


3

I recently decided to build my own wireless router - and I found the Airetos AEX-QCA9880-NX performing very well on my DIY machine: 3 channels 802.11ac/n/g in a miniPCIe shape.


3

T100TA and X205TA are both of Bay Trail-T architecture, that is not properly supported by Linux yet. Actually they are not laptops, they are tablets. You'd better to look at Asus VivoBook X202E, HP Pavilion TouchSmart 11z or Asus Q200 which are traditional laptops. Also you can dual-boot almost any chrome-book with your Linux. Please check your final choice ...


3

The Asus Xonar D2X appears to fulfil your requirements. Here are two links regarding Linux support: http://www.linux-hardware-guide.com/2014-08-02-asus-xonar-d2x-sound-card-pcie-7-1-digital-inout-dolby-dts-eax-192khz-24bit-asio and http://www.alsa-project.org/main/index.php/Matrix:Vendor-Asus Amazon.de appears to list it for under 150€. E.g. http://www....


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