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QNAP TS-231 I've been using a TS-212 just about 24/7 for two years. I was happy enough with it that I recently bought a second QNAP device, albeit one that has 4 drive bays (TS-451). It appears that the TS-212 has been phased out in favor of the TS-231, but the specifications appear to be very similar. I think it will meet your requirements. Put two or ...


9

If you can use an external drive, there's the Toshiba 3TB Canvio HDTB330EK3CA (catchy!) It's 3TB and 2.5 inch, but it's expensive. Expensive to the extent that you could get 2 2TB drives for less than the 3TB. If it's just space and size you're looking at, this could suffice - otherwise, perhaps not. If it's an internal drive you want, Toshiba also have the ...


6

Yup. Its standard as long as its the same from factor. For that matter 7mm and 9mm 2.5 inch drives, and 3.5 inch drives like that all share the same connector. Just make sure its the right form factor to fit in the bay, but you should be fine otherwise. If its a desktop, 2.5 inch (most SSDs are that!) would work with standard cables, though you may need ...


6

Your criteria are impossible to merge together and here is why, ordered by cost. You need a 10 year reliable storage that can handle more or less industrial quality requirements. This is a quite high requirement. Industrial quality is gained by using better materials/components and so have an higher cost. You need a technology that is still around 10 years ...


5

It depends mainly on the type of NAND the SSD uses, and also somewhat on the controller. Higher quality SLC NAND stores one bit per cell. This make the cells much faster and longer lived, whereas MLC and TLC (2 bits and 3 bits) degrade more easily and are harder to read and write, especially write. Since the MLC SSDs are more common, most SSDs do have slow ...


5

I have looked for other HDD that fit your requirements, and the one you linked to in your comments is the best that I have found. Its capacity is 2TB, it is a standard size, so it will fit inside your PS4, and everywhere I have looked, people have stated that it is a reliable drive. The downside to this drive is its speed. White it uses the SATA 6.0 Gbps ...


5

If you really want an android app you should look at certain brands. But if you don't need an app from the router manufacturer, basically any router with a USB and FTP-support should work. To answer your last question: There are routers that come with their own app, but usually you don't have to use that app (especially if FTP is supported). I personally ...


4

OK, so I have used an older version of this product with success, but not had a chance to use their latest version. My experience was good enough to make a general recommendation. Icy Dock now offers a 4 disk enclosure, with lots of nice options (including adjustable fan speeds, dust filters, drive trays) called Black Vortex. You need to have port-...


4

Please note, this is answer is for the Dell Inspiron 15-5558, which hopefully is the same as the OP has. Is my laptop compatible to upgrade to SSD ? Yes, as you can see in the following picture, the drive positioning was clearly designed to make the drive easily replacable. source: NotebookCheck.com (German) What dimensions of SSD will be compatible ?...


3

I'm sorry I don't have a source on this as it's more of a result of long experience in the industry than anything else I can really point to, documentation-wise (so if someone else comes along with a document-supported answer, obviously upvote that answer, not this one), but I am 100% confident that both drives are running at 7200rpm. The difference in model ...


3

If you want a non NUC class machine, just go with a mini ITX system. They arn't as ludicrously small but they have more expansion capability. Looking at these reviews something like the asrock 3150 or 3700 based boards might be a good fit - up to 4 Sata ports (or even 2 in the alternatives) one mini pcie slot (which might be good for 2 more) and a PCIe slot ...


3

SSDs should never be slower than a HDD, especially in small files. The reason is because of how they work. A HDD uses a spinning platter and a read/write head for information access where a SSD uses a controller with flash chips. When reading/writing files, the HDD has to wait for the head to align with the platter before it can be accessed, but a SSD doesn'...


3

I originally posted this article on: HP laptop/MHV2120BH HDD as a comment. It turns out that the correct connection is/was always there. There was an adapter fitted over the SATA connector, for use with HPs internal connector. Am re-posting as an answer in order for others to find more easily.


3

Assuming price is not a concern, neither one has much of an advantage over the other for your purposes. A powered-down laptop hard drive is reasonably shock-resistant: the 500g rating is roughly equivalent to falling off a table onto a concrete floor. A SSD has a much higher random-access speed than a hard drive, but backup and restore are mostly sequential-...


3

It sounds like the best drive for your circumstances is a 3TB Western Digital Green. Normally, I'd never recommend a WD Green because of severe performance issues (the firmware prioritizes power savings over speed of access). However, since you're using the drive for backups rather than as your main drive, the delays probably won't be an issue. ...


3

Its extremely unlikely that a NAS or home server's going to be faster than local storage. You're better off getting fast local storage first if external disks are slowing you down. Your file server would be bottlenecked by your network. As such, the extra speed of 2.5 inch enterprise drives or SSDs are unlikely to be of much benefit, though your ...


2

Based on personal experience (3 out of 4 failed, purchased several months apart) I recommend to stay away from the hybrid drives, as I will be in the future. A limited sample I know, I could have just been unlucky, but at this point I am cutting my losses with that tech. I think with the cost of SSDs dropping, they will have a limited lifespan as a viable ...


2

It depends heavily on what you're looking for in the drive; SSDs are faster but ultimately less reliable. SSDs work using electronic circuits and NAND (or NOR) gates to store data. Traditional HDDs use magnetic platters. This grants SSDs faster performance, since they don't have to spin up the platter and seek to the disk location requested by the OS. ...


2

The answer is simple: yes, switching from HDDs to SSDs is a huge improvement but that depends on the write and read speed of the SSDs themselves. Personally I gave up a 1TB HDD for a 240GBs SSD and it was the best choice ever. (programming, OS and gaming refference) The SSD's write and read speeds are different from one SSD to another. Personally I have ...


2

Yes, the new drive can replace the existing drive. There are a couple things to note though: The Crucial drive is SATA 3. Newegg says that the drive you have is SATA 2. If you assume that the controller can only support SATA 2, you won't get the full transfer speed the Crucial drive is capable of, but SATA is backward compatible and will work. It will fit. ...


2

CPU upgrade should raise your PC performance in CPU dependent apllications and games. HDD to SSD upgrade will significantly raise speed of opening/closing OS, running applications or copying files. I would say that CPU upgrade will give bigger performance boost but HDD->SSD upgrade will reduce times of everyday operations like booting system, copying files, ...


2

The Mediasonic Probox looks like a good option for you. It can be found here It has support for esata and usb 3.0. It has fairly good cooling with a thermal sensor to automatically change the fan speed. It has a power switch and can give you 6 gigabytes per second which is the maximum you are going to find in a sata 3 disk. It also has 4 bay enclosoures and ...


2

The Samsung is much more durable since all the components are manufactured in house and they have very strict quality control. They are both TLC, but the Samsung has a really good TLC flash chip. The Samsung SSD is also much faster than the ADATA.


2

Its a bit tricky. There's three elements to your problem and each of this needs to be handled seperately. Data, Power and 'space' Easiest way? USB 3.0 Hard drives. They are typically fast enough for bulk storage these days, though clearly you arn't going to get blazing fast speeds. A 2.5 inch drive goes up to 2tb, which is pretty impressive data density, ...


2

It's a bit tough finding exact decibel ratings on different hard drives, in general the dbA is not listed under the hard drive's specifications. But I did find one site where sound measurements were taken. The only issue is, it may be a little outdated (October 2014 was it's last update). But, if we assume that the manufacturers and model types are similar ...


2

You can find HDD's under $20 on newegg.com : 80 GB - WD800JD - $9.99 on newegg.com WL 160GB - $14.99 on newegg.com


2

This questions has already been answered but here is concrete information provided from seagate. I also agree with the answer. Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 1.58.13 PM.png


2

I'll recommend the Transcend 256GB USB 3.0 External Solid State Drive, TS256GESD400K. This is an SSD in a USB 3.0 external enclosure. SSDs will help with write and read seek times, as well as proving generally more tolerant of drops and heat. The 256Gb size is on the small side, but this is just about the fastest product you can hope to get for your price ...


2

So, what you are going to want is an internal adapter. You have to be careful when doing this because poorly made ones can fry a motherboard really quick. I've seen cheap ebay adapters take other components hostage as well. I did find the Vantec IDE to SATA converter on new egg. It has a 4 out of 5 star rating across 270 reviews. If this exact model doesn'...


2

Money may be no object to you, but may well be for other readers, there for I'll keep budget in mind. So if not budget, I assume that reliability and resilience are your primary concern. In which case, we can discard Bluray disks; no-one knows yet how these disks will fare over time, even if treated well. But given that they are usually physically more ...


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