Hot answers tagged

25

In almost any case, with a proper, modern compiler, compilation speed will increase near linearly with the number of hardware threads on your system. In the case of Microsoft compilers, even running with 8GB will be plenty fine, as they are fairly stingy with memory allocation. However, on *nix, I have capped out even 16GB with parallel make and GCC. Modern ...


19

In 2005, Intel was running into severe heat problems with the NetBurst-architecture CPUs. A gaming system would likely be AMD-based, running a high-end Venice-series Athlon 64. For homebuilt systems, a popular option was an Opteron 144 overclocked to almost twice the stock speed. Incompatibility with a dual-core CPU would be quite believable, since the ...


14

In 2005, the most powerful single-core CPUs on the market (and the wet dream of every gamer) was AMD FX-55 and later FX-57. For such a machine, 2 GB of RAM would not be unheard of, even in 2005. If you want something with more bang per buck that an ordinary gamer would be likely to have, an Opteron 144 mentioned in the other post would be a good choice (...


12

First, you should figure out what your actual power consumption is. A 600W PSU only draws 600W if the hardware needs it. You can get a Kill-A-Watt or similar monitor in the $15 USD range. You can also get a decent ballpark number from online calculators 1, 2, 3. Don't forget to include your monitor. The UPS you linked only supplies 300W. It gives 10 minutes ...


12

There are many many more options if you build your own system, and you can then be more flexible in terms of the components and the machine that you end up with. For example: are you looking to max out the graphics card? do you want to be able to upgrade said card relatively easily in a year? The other piece of advice is to not get too hung up on ...


9

Any overclockable Intel CPU, if you're willing, or the i7 4790K ($317.99@SuperBiiz) if you're not. Don't just look at clock speed. AMD's FX 9590 has a 5 GHz boost speed, but is slower than Intel's offerings because of a low IPC. A good budget option for overclockers is the dual core Pentium G3258 ($64.99@NCIX), at a mere U$65. Intel released this unlocked ...


9

Your computer's RAM cannot be significantly upgraded. Crucial's memory finder reports, and HP's support page agrees that your computer is limited to 4 GB of RAM. Further, you appear to be running a 32-bit version of Windows, which for technical reasons is limited to about 3.25 GB of RAM. If you really want to do this, I recommend figuring out which of the ...


8

The i7 5820K would be much faster than the i7 6700K. None of the programs you will use will benefit from an i7 5820K or even an i7 6700K for that matter. An i5 6600K will be enough for what you are doing. The 5820K will only benefit from much larger multithreaded workloads (such as virtualization or video rendering) and where more PCIe lanes are needed (...


8

I'll recommend a Gigabyte BRIX, specifically the model with the i5 4570R, a 2.7-3.2 GHz Quad core i5. The iGP is a Iris Pro 5200, with the 128 MB of L4 cache For RAM, I'd recommend a 1866 MT/s 2x8 GB kit, just for a bit of extra speed. It's about $20 more than a 1600 MT/s kit though, so if you want to save a bit of money, it shouldn't matter too much. Price ...


8

While purchasing two cards may seem gnarly, it really wouldn't be better than a single 1080. First, you won't have to fuss around with getting SLI to work properly. Not that its a massive pain, but it is a pain. Second, some games do not even support SLI properly. Now this may not happen often, but imagine your shock when your $1000+ GPU setup won't play ...


7

The only Mini-ITX board I've been able to find with a PCIe x4 slot is the Mitac PH12LI. It is not, however, any smaller than any of the PCIe x16 Mini-ITX boards. Personally, I'd recommend a Casetronic C292 case, an over-the-board PCIe x16 riser card, and the PCIe x16 Mini-ITX board of your choice. Your x4 card should work just fine in an x16 slot, and you ...


7

I have two i7-4790 (3.6GHz) Intel processors. One is in a machine I use only for gaming and the other is in my development machine. Using the link that ArtOfCode provided, this processor currently (September 2015) sits in 6th for Single Thread Performance (behind the 4GHz version of the same processor and some Xeon chips). Newegg lists the price as $310. ...


7

I would recommend something in the GTX 900 series, or the R9 200 or 300 series. If you want the most power possible, the R9 390 and the GTX 970 are both incredibly powerful cards, and just about equal in terms of performance. The only downside is they are just above your price range. (a quick search on google shopping shows most of them to be around 300-...


6

Looking over the specs of the 5820K versus the 6700K, notable differences are: Larger cache (15MB vs 8MB) More cores and threads Higher memory bandwidth All of these would probably be of benefit when working, however it has a lower clock speed. That might be the dealbreaker here, as while having lots of threads is great for multitasking (and possibly ...


6

A Raspberry Pi might be an option, esp. considering it's low power consumption, as well as low cost. WebGL is somewhat experimental, but HTML or Java would work. The Pi 2 has good specs ($35 gives you 1GB RAM and a quadcore CPU), and additionally it has a large community around it so many things are better documented and better supported. Additionally, ...


6

Its more of a general class of systems but chances are you'll want to add your own keyboard, speakers and mic but a "nuc" class system and/or a mini PC of some sort would work well. There's a few considerations here but I'll go through them. Before I talk about hardware, there's a few additional considerations I have. A Bluetooth dongle is cheap and tiny, ...


5

Honestly it won't make much of a difference. While they are clocked differently, all of the core M chips (and indeed, all modern CPUs) are designed to throttle down when not in use. The exact voltage and frequency depends on binning, so the higher tier chips could have a slight advantage, but it's negligible compared to usage by screen. If you really ...


5

For a 80-Plus Platinum power supply, efficiencies are between around 5% of one another between the 20 to 100% range of load(88-92, give or take a percent). It tops at around 70% load. Having more than required is certainly not a bad thing. PSU's like the HCP are rated to deliver their full wattage at fairly high temperatures, and 300W is enough for any card....


5

I'm currently doing 4k gaming - a 980TI is probably the most sensible option - its 90% of the performance of this generation's titan at 75% of the cost stock but I'd wait for the next generation if possible. On one hand they promise massive improvements. On the other hand, last gen hardware is cheaper. What do I base this on? I'm running a ivy bridge core ...


5

As long as you are happy with 80+ Platinum and the power envelope, there have been no significant improvements in power supply technology over the past few years. A quality PSU is a quality PSU. If it's been sat in a box, it won't have degraded, as it would have under use (PSU calculators use a 10% per year worst case in their analysis, generally you get ...


5

Would highly recommend and AMD RX 480 - 4GB model. That is less than 200 Euros i believe. If you save a big more you could get the 8GB model, given if you are just watching HD movies and rendering videos than the 4GB model should be perfect for you use cases! Plus, Sony Vegas does get Accelerated Graphics support from AMD Graphics Cards, so you will be able ...


5

Great System Design, Daniele! For all of your components you'll need about: 170 watts for your 1060 GPU 160 watts for 16 GB of RAM 91 watts for the i7-6700 30 watts for your drives 25 watts for the cooling system 40 watts for the Motherboard Minimum TDP Requirement: 516 watts Recommendation: Opt for a 600W PSU to give yourself some headroom for OC or ...


5

I'll open by saying I am not an authority on VR tech nor do I follow the scene as a hobby. I own an HTC Vive and have used a Rift once or twice. TL;DR: I love my Vive, I'd spend the money above the Rift to get it, but that's not the right choice for everyone. Promising tech is on the horizon. Promising options on both the lower and higher budget ends ...


5

A product like this is non-existent. Today's component sizes are way bigger than this, so it is not possible to fit those specs into such a small thing.


4

It looks like your case has standard front-panel audio. If that's correct, it makes finding compatible front-panel bays much easier. The cheapest 5.25" bay I've been able to find is this $40 bay from Kingwin, which in addition to two USB 3.0 ports and HD audio, has an eSATA port, an everything-under-the-sun card reader, two fan controllers, and a ...


4

Upgrading your GPU Guessing at your budget, I'm going to recommend a R9 380, or GTX 960. Both are pretty equal cards, and the GTX 960 pulls ahead in nVidia optimized games but I'm not going to go into that. Upgrading to either will be an extreme improvement to your current GPU. (Benchmarks) Upgrading CPU If you are looking to upgrade your CPU, which in my ...


4

The answer is "it depends". The Tomshardware graphics hierarchy places your 9600 GT seven steps above a HD 4600, where three steps is the minimum worthwhile upgrade. However, the hierarchy is strictly about pixel-pushing ability. Your 9600 GT only supports DirectX 10 and OpenGL 2.1, and doesn't support OpenCL at all. In contrast, the integrated GPU ...


4

Integrated GPU's will never be as good as a dedicated graphics card because of the space constraint: when the GPU is integrated with the CPU, there is far less space for the GPU to fit into, so not as much graphics processing power can fit in it. I believe the HD 4600 is two generations above what I have in my laptop, the HD 4400. My graphics card is ...


4

550W is enough and gives you enough room for overclocking I think... Also, the power supply you have in mind is Gold rated and, as I understand, that's as important as the watt quantity. Also, the 1060 is very power efficient so you should be ok. As an alternative, I have the EVGA 550W G2 which is also great, its pretty much like the one you indicated I'm ...


3

You might consider looking for a used point of sale system. I've played with PARs, Microses, and Alohas and have never had any trouble with Debian. Even the touchscreens generally work with out of the box installations. Certainly not as fuel efficient as a Pi (though POSes do still use processors designed for efficiency rather than performance), but ...


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