9

It would cost you more to build one from scratch than just buying a used one My recommendation is based on experience, In last 6 months i have used 4U servers from 3 different vendors, Dell, HP, IBM Models Dell PowerEdge R900(more choices in HDD) HP DL580 G5(most favorite) IBM System X3850 M2(least favorite) Dell PowerEdge R900 Pros 4 Quad Cores ...


7

If you are worried about building a machine, don't build it. You may lose out a tiny bit on hardware, but in return you usually get limited manufacturer support. The trade off between more hardware and more support is a valid reason to buy pre-built (and configured) hardware. The next question you need to answer for yourself, is whether you are going to ...


5

The issue with your question is there's no allusion or reference to compute requirements. This puts some of your requirements at odds with each other. Observe: Intel® Core™ i7-6920HQ Processor (6th Generation) Base Freq. 2.9 GHz. 4 Cores, 8 Threads 8M Cache MSRP: $568 ARK Link Intel® Core™ i3-6100H Processor (6th Generation) Base Freq. 2.7 GHz. 2 Cores, ...


4

There is always a use for more RAM. I always suggest getting the most possible. All depends on the budget. As for the bare minimum I'd recommend: 16GB of RAM Xcode Studio: 8GB recommended Android Studio : 8 GB recommended Laravel: 4GB or more 16GB of RAM is the base spec of the Macbook Pro 16. Which is good enough for most people. Unless you run Xcode, ...


4

It is not possible to run 2 x i7 because they are consumer grade CPUs and do not support multi CPU configurations. I do not believe there is a laptop that can simultaneously use 2 CPUs at once because of power and thermal limitations. You should look into mobile workstations that feature either an Xeon or an i7 Extreme edition CPU with at least 16GB of RAM. ...


4

I'd rather build than buy. It really depends on your needs though. If you're worried about noise, a home system actually makes a decent VM box. There's a few things I go for. More cores. Get at least a quad core. For serious work a 'mainstream' core. I like a minimum of a quad core box - a core i7 is a decent workhorse machine, but both my ...


4

As a starting point, I'd recommend the Haswell-E i7 5820K. 6 cores on the X99 platform, similar to the Xeon E5 16xx v3s but cheaper, unlocked and without certain server features, it can currently be purchased at U$320 if you live near a microcenter, and U$390 if you don't. The clock speed can be increased, through you shouldn't expect much above 4.5 GHz. ...


3

Bit of an odd set of parts here, and you'd need to build it but... the X10SDV-8C+-LN2F would be a good start. Street prices seem to be around the 1000 usd range for the board. The xeon-d in general seems to be a great choice for this kind of workload, and this specific model seems best suited to stick inside a 'regular' desktop case since it has a cooler ...


3

32-64 GB of RAM definitely. Probably get a chipset that goes up to 64GB but get 32GB first leaving extra slots available to upgrade. VM RAM can fluctuate and is largely based on what your doing with it and how much you need to give it. I can run 3-4 VM's which I deem to be fairly average VM's + about 40-60 chrome tabs off of 32GB no problem. There's usually ...


3

If you're OK with the noise and the potentially large power bill, you could always go for an off-lease rack-mount server. For example, I currently own two high-grade but outdated (from the enterprise perspective) servers. One is an Apple Xserve from 2008, which I upgraded to dual quad-core 3GHz Xeon CPUs, 32GB of RAM and 6TB of storage - total cost ...


2

You might be interested in the APU boards from PC-Engines. I'm using one for my home-spun router. You get 3 Gig-E interfaces, a dual-core AMD CPU that appears to support virtualization, 2 or 4 GB of RAM, and SD card/mSATA/USB boot capability. You use a serial port to access the system console, and there's no multimedia to speak of. http://www.pcengines.ch/...


2

Your colleagues may have a quadcore in their Laptops, but one each only. Haven´t seen a laptop with two CPUs yet. That´s what you have MultiCore for nowadays. See more detailed info at https://superuser.com/questions/906539/is-using-multiple-cpus-possible-in-a-laptop (see Coretool´s answer) and https://www.quora.com/Personal-computers-Dual-processors-Why-...


2

An OS will be running on the card; so I need short access times, and it seems that microSDs are better than any standard SD in that respect. I will give the SanDisk Extreme PRO microSD 64GB a chance (read access min/max/avg: 0.24ms/1.33ms/0.61ms; write access 1.18ms/80.02ms/1.69ms) and put it into a Bosvision adapter (https://www.amazon.com//dp/B01AT7ECA2 ...


2

The Surface Book actually supports UHS-II from what I have seen. I think the Lexar Professional 2000x Series UHS-II/U3 of SD cards should fit your needs. For a bit more, you can also get a 128gb from Lexar in the same series. If price is a bit too extravagant for your management, the SanDisk Extreme Pro (UHS-II) is available for a slightly cheaper in a 64gb ...


2

Changing the CPU is not as easy as adding RAM or swapping a HDD. It is a FULL dissasembly. Have a look at this video here. Still want to do it, then narrow your list of possible options. We can use the Intel ARK to get a list of processors that will fit in your laptop. Looks like the Intel i3-330M is the cheapest processor which supports VT-x and isn't a ...


2

Main uses would be Linux OS Programming (C++) Virtual machines while your requirements are reliability price Assuming you want an internal SSD, I would say that you would in theory want an SSD with SLC, however, they are more expensive. For example a search on newegg.com for SLC in the range $100-200 resulted in 1 match WD Green M.2 2280 240GB ...


2

A. Gigabyte Tech Support asks you to contact them to obtain the Z390AORUSPROGA9.zip BIOS and apply it to your existing motherboard. See https://pastebin.com/uqYt3rmx for details of their response. I regret I can't provide a direct link to the BIOS update file they suggested, so you have to contact them to get it. B. Gigabyte TS replied and suggested their ...


2

They both Turbo to 3.7GHz, so all else being equal, you are unlikely to see much difference per core, and indeed, Passmark shows an ~8.8% increase in single thread rating for that ~23% clock increase from 2.1GHz to 2.6GHz, and yet going from 12 cores to 16 cores resulted in ~0.3% decrease in rating. Keep in mind,the sample size is exceedingly small (1 and ...


1

Null Byte, via WonderHowTo, has a nice article on the best wireless adapters for Kali Linux. Here are the listed compatible chipsets: Atheros AR9271 Ralink RT3070 Ralink RT3572 Realtek 8187L (Wireless G adapters) Realtek RTL8812AU (newly in 2017) my research also suggests the Ralink RT5370N is compatible You can find direct purchase links ...


1

I would advise you to consider, independently of everything, an SSD, since it is a component that really makes the difference. I recommend 16GB of RAM, so you can ensure a remarkable longevity, both for local use and for VM.


1

Consider this build: Intel 8th gen i5 8600k G.Skill Ripjaws RAM. These ones can be from 4 to 16GB in each stick, but of course more costly. A motherboard that supports overclocking (z370 PRO4 for example) and has enough RAM slots, GTX 1050 Most importantly, your CPU cooler must have high TDP( like the H7) Also, your PSU I would say should be about 600w ...


1

This is the only one I was able to find that meets all of your requirements. The memory comes with 16gb in this config, what I consider the minimum to meet your needs. Its up-gradable to 32gb. The GPU is a 960M, this will push most game @ 1080p in high/ultra settings just fine. Poorly optimized AAA games might have to be toned down by removing shadows or ...


1

If you're just running one VM, then the i7-6700K will be just fine for you. While it only has four cores, those cores have hyperthreading, which means that as far as your OS and the VM are concerned, your computer would have eight cores. This actually does improve performance. I'm not going to get into the black magic that makes it all work, but for your ...


1

I'd essentially mirror my answer here and build something around a X10SDV-6C+-TLN4F Xeon-D based system. Newegg has it for a hair under the grand including an embedded CPU, and unlike some other models, it has a cooling solution. This dosen't include the ram but it'll take standard DDR4, and up to 64 gb of non ECC stuff (or 128gb of Rdimm ram). Lets talk ...


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