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14

Whether the firmware has been compromised is a valid concern — it happens (it's been done for show, and it's rather rare but it has been found in the wild). But a bigger concern is whether the firmware has been programmed correctly. Many SSD firmwares don't implement secure erase properly. Should you trust them to implement crypto properly? I haven't seen a ...


6

I've got the 256gb variant of the Samsung 850 Pro and running a few tests would be quite enlightening. Improving compile time may also depend on processor so... it depends on your options. Likewise with IDE & Git performance. That said, I upgraded from an 840 (which I can't find the benchmarks for, its on my laptop at the moment) and it was a significant ...


5

Moving from HDD to any new SSD will be noticable, while the differences between particular SSD tend to be slight. I actually did the same (also ssd upgrade for programming) and just went with the cheapest SSD at the time (Kingston), because my laptop only supported SATA II (300 MB/s). If you have SATA III and want something premium, the Samsung 850 250 GB is ...


5

Edit: After understanding that the mSATA port will block the HDD drive bay I would suggest a Dual mSATA HDD adapter. Feedback is appreciated from anyone who is actively using such a setup as a boot drive on any OS. Edit 2016-04-17: I hoped that Skylake equipped business laptops (HP, Lenovo, Dell…) would offer plenty of M.2 slots for SATA or NVMe storage, ...


5

It depends mainly on the type of NAND the SSD uses, and also somewhat on the controller. Higher quality SLC NAND stores one bit per cell. This make the cells much faster and longer lived, whereas MLC and TLC (2 bits and 3 bits) degrade more easily and are harder to read and write, especially write. Since the MLC SSDs are more common, most SSDs do have slow ...


4

The 840 EVO and 850 EVO are both consumer TLC SSDs by Samsung. The EVO series doesn't exactly have any differentiation, and the 850 EVO is not the higher end model, rather, it is the newer generation. The reason that the 840 EVO has risen in price is most likely because it's an retired series and therefore no longer manufactured in volume. The chief ...


4

Since, you're starting out with coding I wouldn't expect you to be using heavy Integrated Developer Environments, like Visual Studio + Resharper which can weigh heavily on the performance of your cpu and non-volatile memory storage devices. I've focused on budget laptops that should work fine for basic C coding. I've purposely avoided HDDs because they tend ...


4

Please note, this is answer is for the Dell Inspiron 15-5558, which hopefully is the same as the OP has. Is my laptop compatible to upgrade to SSD ? Yes, as you can see in the following picture, the drive positioning was clearly designed to make the drive easily replacable. source: NotebookCheck.com (German) What dimensions of SSD will be compatible ?...


4

The real question is: What do you need it for? CPU I wouldn't really care about the processor, as long as you don't do anything requiring an intensive processing power. You can find a lot of cpu comparing sites by searching on any search engine "cpu compare" or "cpu benchmark". Storage The SSD will gargantuanly benefit the performance. The computer ...


3

As far as raw speed is concerned, the Samsung EVO is the way to go. The drives themselves are very reliable and have the faster read (540mb/s) and write (520mb/s) speeds. I myself have a Samsung EVO and it works flawlessly in my PC. In my PS4... well I haven't tried it in there. Some people claim its a bad idea, and that you won't see any difference in ...


3

Does it make sense to store relatively large sample libraries in a remote location? It makes sense, but it's not at all beneficial. If you're going to be pulling samples into your project fairly often, you'll be much better off storing them locally so you only have to depend on drive connection transfer rates. Would it be smarter to get a network switch to ...


3

SSDs should never be slower than a HDD, especially in small files. The reason is because of how they work. A HDD uses a spinning platter and a read/write head for information access where a SSD uses a controller with flash chips. When reading/writing files, the HDD has to wait for the head to align with the platter before it can be accessed, but a SSD doesn'...


3

Solid State Drives use about 8W of power while HDD use 12W or so on average. That doesnt directly show heat output but it should help you get an idea. So SSD aren't any hotter than HDD besides NVME ssd's. For example NVME 950 Pro from samsung is known to get upto 100C and start thermal throttling to prevent damage. If you dont know what NVME is then i will ...


3

GE62 6QF Apache Pro You have multiple options in my opinion. See if your shop offers this Laptop with a SSD. This would be the easiest option for you probably Get a M.2 SSD - your laptop supports the new M.2 SSD's which are even faster than the regular SSD's. If a normal user really needs this is questionable but having the option is nice. It is more ...


3

Assuming price is not a concern, neither one has much of an advantage over the other for your purposes. A powered-down laptop hard drive is reasonably shock-resistant: the 500g rating is roughly equivalent to falling off a table onto a concrete floor. A SSD has a much higher random-access speed than a hard drive, but backup and restore are mostly sequential-...


3

Answers up front: does it support an additional SSD or have I to replace its current HDD with a new SSD? Yes, you should* be able to install an M.2 SSD alongside your current HDD (see below). You can also replace the current 2.5 inch HDD with a 2.5 inch SSD. And which form factor should I look for when shopping? The M.2 SSD and 2.5 inch HDD / SSD / SSHD ...


2

SDDs are quite conspicuous when it comes to quality and performance. Capacity, read/write times are made very clear so you can buy what you need. Any further optimisation will come down to your OS, and they're usually pretty good. 250 GB is more than I need for programming but if you think you need that then go for it. Depending on the size of the project, ...


2

The answer is simple: yes, switching from HDDs to SSDs is a huge improvement but that depends on the write and read speed of the SSDs themselves. Personally I gave up a 1TB HDD for a 240GBs SSD and it was the best choice ever. (programming, OS and gaming refference) The SSD's write and read speeds are different from one SSD to another. Personally I have ...


2

It will not be possible to build a new gaming system for 300 RON. You will need at least the following: Motherboard RAM 8GB SSD 120GB + Graphics Card Power supply I'm assuming you already have a monitor, keyboard and mouse and you will be using a free operating system, e.g. linux. The cheapest SSD 120GB on dc-shop.ro is: http://www.dc-shop.ro/ssd_uri/...


2

The Samsung is much more durable since all the components are manufactured in house and they have very strict quality control. They are both TLC, but the Samsung has a really good TLC flash chip. The Samsung SSD is also much faster than the ADATA.


2

Yes, the new drive can replace the existing drive. There are a couple things to note though: The Crucial drive is SATA 3. Newegg says that the drive you have is SATA 2. If you assume that the controller can only support SATA 2, you won't get the full transfer speed the Crucial drive is capable of, but SATA is backward compatible and will work. It will fit. ...


2

After checking specification of your motherboard (from this link) I checked that you have one PCI-E connector which will support PCI-E Solid State Drive. You have two possible solutions: Buy M2 to PCIe adapter: Addonics M.2 PCIe SSD Adapter X110 / $30 in their shop Buy new SSD drive: Kingston HyperX Predator 240GB (with HHHL Adapter) -> $180 on newegg....


2

Most important question is what is your budget and what will you use it for ? Also I have some doubts about your setup and I will list them below changing some elements to "better" or "compatible": 1.Why Haswell not Skylake ? If you are thinking about so strong setup you should think about newest platform (Skylake) and change CPU and Motherboard. Intel ...


2

It's going to be very difficult to find a quad port SATA controller that does not have RAID capabilities built in so you might as well get it with RAID and just not turn on that feature. It is nice, however, to know that you can go RAID if you want to later down the line. That said, I would stay away from the smaller brands that don't have a strong ...


2

What you have there is called mSATA. These are available from every SSD manufacturer but I am very partial to both Samsung and Crucial as I have used many of their products in the past without issue. I have provided links in order of preference: Samsung 850 EVO 500GB Crucial MX200 500GB mSATA Both are priced right around the same price point and both ...


2

I'll recommend the Transcend 256GB USB 3.0 External Solid State Drive, TS256GESD400K. This is an SSD in a USB 3.0 external enclosure. SSDs will help with write and read seek times, as well as proving generally more tolerant of drops and heat. The 256Gb size is on the small side, but this is just about the fastest product you can hope to get for your price ...


2

There is no such thing as "850 Evo Pro" it's either EVO or PRO. IN any case go for the Pro versions. I have lots of SSDs here, among them also the 850 Pro and the Kingston HyperX Predator 240GB PCIe. If you do have a M.2 NVMe capable slot, then there's no question: go for that. SATA is really not suitable for modern SSDs anymore(the numbers you see with the ...


2

Personally, I don't pay so much attention to brand name when it comes to this sort of thing. I tend to like to look at benchmarks and reviews to get an idea of how well an SSD should perform. You don't give too much details on your build, so it's hard to recommend one specifically, but I've had great success with the Samsung evo SSDs. I put one these into ...


2

Main uses would be Linux OS Programming (C++) Virtual machines while your requirements are reliability price Assuming you want an internal SSD, I would say that you would in theory want an SSD with SLC, however, they are more expensive. For example a search on newegg.com for SLC in the range $100-200 resulted in 1 match WD Green M.2 2280 240GB ...


2

After doing some more hunting with weird search terms, I have found a solution in the Amazon Marketplace: https://www.amazon.com/NGFF-PCIe-Adapter-Samsung-SM951/dp/B01MS64UBB US$ 34.95 .. a bit expensive for a board with virtually nothing to it, but oh well. This is the correct non-SATA adapter card, if all it has is the M.2 slot with no chips on the ...


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