Hot answers tagged

6

Yup. Its standard as long as its the same from factor. For that matter 7mm and 9mm 2.5 inch drives, and 3.5 inch drives like that all share the same connector. Just make sure its the right form factor to fit in the bay, but you should be fine otherwise. If its a desktop, 2.5 inch (most SSDs are that!) would work with standard cables, though you may need ...


5

Edit: After understanding that the mSATA port will block the HDD drive bay I would suggest a Dual mSATA HDD adapter. Feedback is appreciated from anyone who is actively using such a setup as a boot drive on any OS. Edit 2016-04-17: I hoped that Skylake equipped business laptops (HP, Lenovo, Dell…) would offer plenty of M.2 slots for SATA or NVMe storage, ...


4

To use SATA Express, you would need to use a SSD that supports SATA Express. I'm currently not aware of a SSD that supports SATA Express. It does have a much higher theoretical speed than SATA and would be good for SSDs. I would still recommend a SSD through PCIe or M.2 (which uses PCIe internally).


3

TL;DR: Get an R510 instead of a case. If you already own a motherboard or need to buy new, get an RPC-4116 (if you need to buy new or prefer a cleaner solution) or a DAS and an LSI 9200-8e. Finding an enclosure with 10+ hot-swap bays is incredibly easy–just take a look at Newegg's server chassis page. Right away though, you'll notice the first issue: price....


3

I originally posted this article on: HP laptop/MHV2120BH HDD as a comment. It turns out that the correct connection is/was always there. There was an adapter fitted over the SATA connector, for use with HPs internal connector. Am re-posting as an answer in order for others to find more easily.


2

The technical document (page 3-10, which is the tenth page of that PDF) for this drive says it's a standard SATA connector; 15 power pins P1-15 and 7 signal pins S1-7. For this, you'd need a standard double SATA signal/power connector; something like this, perhaps. However, something about your pictures looks off. Look at the pictures of the cable I linked ...


2

It's going to be very difficult to find a quad port SATA controller that does not have RAID capabilities built in so you might as well get it with RAID and just not turn on that feature. It is nice, however, to know that you can go RAID if you want to later down the line. That said, I would stay away from the smaller brands that don't have a strong ...


2

After checking specification of your motherboard (from this link) I checked that you have one PCI-E connector which will support PCI-E Solid State Drive. You have two possible solutions: Buy M2 to PCIe adapter: Addonics M.2 PCIe SSD Adapter X110 / $30 in their shop Buy new SSD drive: Kingston HyperX Predator 240GB (with HHHL Adapter) -> $180 on newegg....


2

In a million years, I would have never thought that this existed. But.. The Sata Switch is a thing. This model, can hold 4 different SATA3 drives. I read the product description and information, and it seems like it will do everything you are looking to do, for the cool price of 79.00. Literally cuts the power from the unused drives, I'm assuming ...


1

A desktop-style ATX-type SMPS/PSU/power supply (whatever you want to call it) will not deliver power if it does not sense a motherboard, unless you acquire a diagnostic test adapter or equivalent circuit to imitate the circuitry of a motherboard. Pre-ATX power supplies would, but those are a long, long time gone. Unless your laptop has a dedicated eSATA ...


1

Start with a USB 3 to SATA III combi cable. Add a short SATA male-female cable to the drive end of the combi cable. Now you're free to handle the drive power requirements, however you wish.


1

M.2 SATA SSD may not work in this slot. SATA M.2 SSDs and 2.5-inch SATA SSDs - in fact, work with the same characteristics. NVMe M.2 drives work on the PCIe bus, and these are completely different indicators in throughput, they are significantly higher than the SATA bus. laptop support SATA M.2 SSD or NVMe M.2 SSD 5575 Inspiron and M.2 Nvme drives


1

The small one is not the SATA Express connector. Each SATA Express connector consists of two ordinary SATA connectors and the small one, all in line. Here, you see two SATA Express connector on the motherboard: a used one and a free one: Similarly, here's a SATA Express cable: You may also be interested by What Is SATA Express? article.


1

Unfortunately, there seems to be a lack of higher-bandwidth SATA controllers. The closest I can find are PCIe 2.0 x2, which is available on some StarTech cards. They are based on the Marvell 88SE9220/88SE9230/88SE9235 controllers. Given the lack of SATA options, the next best avenue is a SAS HBA, which supports SATA drives when the appropriate cable is used....


1

If it's just for just for reading some hard drives as you stated in your requirements, a simple universal USB to SATA adapter is more than enough. These have both IDE and SATA interfaces as well as an external power brick to to provide the power that desktop drives need. Most are able to support both 3.5" (desktop) and 2.5" (laptop) drives. USB 3.0 ensures ...


1

SATA 1 150mb/s SATA 2 300mb/s SATA 3 600mb/s If the RAID controller has SATA 3 connectors it should be able to handle it. If you are looking for raw speed a samsung ssd will do 500-550mb/s read and 300+mb/s write beating any 2 hard drives you can attach via SATA.


1

You would need a motherboard bridge adapter such as the following IDE to SATA Adapter: References 3.5" HDD IDE/PATA to SATA Converter Add On Card Adapte for IDE 40-pin hard drive disk,DVD Burner to SATA 7pin Motherboard - Newegg.com File:IDE-SATA ADAPTER.jpg - Wikimedia Commons


1

TL;DR: Your motherboard + an LSI 9211-8i, or just a motherboard with more SATA ports. Motherboard upgrade If you're willing to manage with a slightly lower amount of ports, just get a motherboard with a bunch of SATA ports! The most I know of is 22 on the ASRock Z87 Extreme11/ac. You'll notice two things though: You can't find this board. Seriously, good ...


1

First of all, impression as if stored on their own desktop is not something you will be able to get, unless files are very small. Accessing files via network is, of course, noticeably slower. Not much, but just noticeably. Though iSCSI sometimes does an awesome job at caching locally (SMB not so). Second, a simple SATA hard disk (with nothing special) is ...


1

I have an older model of this drive adapter: Newertech USB 3.0 Universal Drive Adapter which of course means mine is USB 2.0. The specifications on the web site indicate that the device will work with a USB 2.0 port. The power supply to the hard drives is a separate set of components. As you note in your question, you already have power to your drive. You ...


1

That's a custom connector, specific to your brand of laptop. It should be possible to pull it off to reveal SATA power and data connectors underneath, which will work with your existing cables.


1

You're honestly better off just formatting each hard drive individually. It would probably take less time to format them one by one than to search around for a good deal on a 10x hard drive supporting server rack. It probably wouldn't be worth the money at all to buy a new rack and barely worth it to buy a second hand server for the sole purpose of ...


1

Here is something that can address your situation, but you will have to be a little flexible, due to the fact your desired cable fix does not exist. Kingwin HDD Power Switch Module 6 Switches for 5.25-Inch Bay Idea is simple. Have HDD/SSDs connected to each SATA port on the board, and have power distributed to each drive via the switch module. You can ...


1

I'd recommend the SYBA SD-VIA-1A2S PCI card, $15 from Newegg. It provides two SATA I ports, is universal PCI, and supports Linux. It's got LBA-48 support, so it will work with drives larger than 137 GB, and should work with drives larger than 2 TB. If you need it, it supports booting from attached hard drives (but not attached optical drives). I don't ...


1

This is all I could find: https://www.bestfinds.org/dual-ide-sata-drive-docking-station-with-memory-card-reader-usb-2-0-hub-c3a76a3b38acef05.html https://www.bestfinds.org/camonity-2-5-3-5-sata-ide-hdd-docking-station-clone-hdd-enclosure-usb-2-ports-usb-2-0-hub-ms-m2-xd-cf-sd-tf-card-reader-480mbps-4c4567df2d676c02.html I hope these help.


1

So technically, YES, there is such a thing: The Gigabyte i-RAM (second generation). However, its performance is limited to the SATA I spec, so you're not really going to get a whole lot of good stuff out of it. It's also incredibly rare - but sometimes they do go for cheap. It's probably a better bet to put those guys into a computer that can use them as a ...


1

You can use iSCSI to connect your SATA drive over the network. AoE is faster but unsecure. Both technologies use an exclusive link and cannot be shared to more than one computer at a time. Your Gigabit network is OK. However beware of cheap switches that handles a low number of packets per seconds. Those are SAN technologies: you share a storage device ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible