17

There are more parameters when comparing and choosing CPUs. Also lets not forget that performance depends on what we do. Lets bring list of parameters which can affect performance (sorted by importance, high to low). Performance: CPU frequency - how many GHz. The most important parameter. The more, the better. Core/Thread count - (another very important ...


11

The most obvious way is just to simply benchmark the two against each other. If you have a machine with each processor installed, or one machine with the ability to change the processor, then you can run tests. One machine would be better, to preserve all the other contributing aspects. Perform some common tasks with each processor installed. These should ...


7

TL;DR: Ryzen, unless you plan on never, ever touching this computer after building it. Let's take a quick look at the advantages/disadvantages: Ryzen | FX –––––––––––––––––––|––––––––––––––––––– Performance | Performance/$ Platform | Platform cost Upgrade path | Performance While I'm having ...


5

This could help you find your answer. As you can see for photo editing the 6700k is pretty good but not the best As you can see here, the 5960x does beat it quite often then not but it's also 3 times the price So between the 6700k and 5820k multicore: 5820k is about 25% faster. singlecore the 6700k is 23% faster. these are from benchmark scores You ...


2

The other answers are technically correct, but are IMHO unlikely to help. The benchmark you care the most about is your real-life usage of the processor. Watch yourself using the processor and watch how the processor is doing in critical times, for instance by using htop or whatever works for you. Find the critical components, compare measures for those. ...


1

I was wondering how the real systems do start immediately? They don't? A simple Google search reveals, for instance, that Tesla boot time is ways longer than the one of a Raspberry Pi. I'm not even talking about devices other than cars. Most home routers need a minute or two to boot, and where I work, a Xerox machine takes up to ten minutes to boot. In a ...


1

Ryzen has the clear advantage. How good a CPU is isn't only affected by the number of cores. There is much more to CPUs than that. Ryzen does way better in both multi-threaded and single-threaded workloads than any FX chip because of that. Core count is what companies use for marketing as the average user thinks that more cores is always better, which is ...


1

Ryzen series chips actually have the edge right now against Intel's offerings when dealing with multi-threaded workloads. Yes, they are great for gaming, but they're great for production as well. Providing that budget and availability is not an issue, I firmly recommend the newer Ryzen series over the older FX series. Ryzen has significantly more speed and ...


1

If you have some DDR3 RAM and a PSU and case laying around, you might consider upgrading from ARM to x86, which would be a real boost not only to your single-threaded performance, but also to your graphics and RAM capacity. Of course as a whole package it will end up being bulkier and slightly more expensive. If x86 isn't an option, you should be aware that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible