10

I recommend Corsair's AX760 Has the connectors specified (24 pin ATX and 8 pin CPU) 80 Plus Platinum certification Standard size 760 watts (if you feel that's to close to the estimated 600W pointed out in the comments, you can upgrade to the 860W for $20 more) Cost: $150 (on sale); $200 (full price) It is fully modular Not only does it have a dedicated fan.....


9

I recommend Siva Cycle's "The Atom". This product mounts to the rear wheel. Siva has good instructions on how to install it. Using this, it can charge constantly via USB. I use it to charge my HTC M8 while using it's GPS features. It also has a battery pack, which you can use for power while away from your bicycle. One very important note: This does not ...


9

TLDR: In this modern age, the most affordable practical bulletproof "won't get fired for recommending this" solution is a Tesla PowerWall or competitor. The "cheap at all costs" solution is a bank of batteries and a DC PSU (or if the server doesn't support that, an inverter). Gen and UPS solutions are simply not made for this, and force-fitting them will ...


7

Since you mentioned EU 230V, I've tried to source from EU suppliers. The first OEM that sprang to mind was Seasonic. Indeed, there's the Seasonic X-400 Fanless 400W, 140,13 euros at Amazon.it. There's also the Titanium rated AX 1500i, but that's less efficent and way too costly. However, monetarily, is it really worth it? Even a good quality PSU is unlikely ...


7

Watts (W) and volt-amperes (VA) are both representing electrical power, but they are not (necessarily) the same. Power in watts refers to real power and represents how much energy is consumed/dissipated. Power in volt-amperes refers to apparent power, which provides information how much current it will draw.


6

PSU recommendations are tough because it is a fairly quickly shifting market (not as bad as some, but nonetheless). I have personally had good experiences with several Corsair models, Enermax, EVGA and a couple of others over the years, so how do you go about picking one again? My lazy default is probably Corsair, but that is covered in other answers, and ...


5

If a good USB Hub with more than 4 ports is what you are looking for then you should check out Anker USB Hubs like this one https://www.anker.com/products/A7513141 It's a 7 port Aluminum hub, USB 3.0, with a 5V 3.0A power adapter. As for reviews.... Their site: From Amazon: They make hubs that go from 4 ports to 14 ports so there is a lot of choice. ...


5

As long as you are happy with 80+ Platinum and the power envelope, there have been no significant improvements in power supply technology over the past few years. A quality PSU is a quality PSU. If it's been sat in a box, it won't have degraded, as it would have under use (PSU calculators use a 10% per year worst case in their analysis, generally you get ...


5

I'm with Andy on the Corsair PSUs. They're always the best quality on the market and they come with great price tags. I'll recommend something a little different though: the Corsair HX850i is part of the HX gaming series and is built for high performance with low noise output. Specifications: 840 Watts – more than enough room for extra graphics cards ...


5

For a 80-Plus Platinum power supply, efficiencies are between around 5% of one another between the 20 to 100% range of load(88-92, give or take a percent). It tops at around 70% load. Having more than required is certainly not a bad thing. PSU's like the HCP are rated to deliver their full wattage at fairly high temperatures, and 300W is enough for any card....


5

There are a couple Cooler Master, Corsair (AX and RM) and EVGA series power supplies that disable their fan under low load. My recommendation: EVGA SuperNova 550 G2 (220-G2-0550-Y1) Within budget ($80 at newegg) EVGA Eco Mode: Fan does not switch on until PSU load is above 25% 550 Watts, which is just above your calculated optimal. 80 plus Gold for ...


5

Great System Design, Daniele! For all of your components you'll need about: 170 watts for your 1060 GPU 160 watts for 16 GB of RAM 91 watts for the i7-6700 30 watts for your drives 25 watts for the cooling system 40 watts for the Motherboard Minimum TDP Requirement: 516 watts Recommendation: Opt for a 600W PSU to give yourself some headroom for OC or ...


5

Apparently this CPU is a bad combination with my GPU; I have been told that they will not work together. That CPU and GPU will work together just fine. GPU's are designed to be compatible with most CPU architectures, including offerings from Intel and AMD. Ryzen is AMD's new platform, and just like any new release there were some kinks to work out in ...


4

Using eXtreme Outer Vision's eXtreme Power Supply calculator, the power consumption of your build comes to about 390 W. With some overclocking, this becomes 470 W. Any decent 500 - 550 W PSU should handle the load fine for several years with no problems, even if you do overclock a bit later. I personally won't recommend the Corsair VS series, as it uses ...


4

I've taken a look at the website and here are my final two options: Thermaltak 450w Modular? No. (-) Cost? 159 zł. (+) Size/Length? 120mm. Warranty? 24 months. (+) Corsair VS Series, 550w Modular? No. (-) Cost? 215 zł. (+) Size/Length? 120mm. Warranty? 36 months. (++) I would take the Corsair VS Series, as it has a better warranty and it has 100 more ...


4

A brief calculation from a power calculator puts that build at needing around 600W of power (I made some assumptions about memory type and number of fans, as well as optical drives). In that case, I recommend Corsair's AX760, again. This is above what should be required, giving you room to expand your components at a later date. It also is 80 Plus ...


4

Find out what form factor the original PSU is, then buy a PSU Adapter Plate which will adapt whatever that form factor is to standard ATX. Then attach that plate to your new PSU, and then bolt the other form factor edge to the darker gray object (object [1] in your nomenclature). Should work, though you might have to get creative with fasteners (you might ...


4

550W is enough and gives you enough room for overclocking I think... Also, the power supply you have in mind is Gold rated and, as I understand, that's as important as the watt quantity. Also, the 1060 is very power efficient so you should be ok. As an alternative, I have the EVGA 550W G2 which is also great, its pretty much like the one you indicated I'm ...


3

Mini-Box OpenUPS does the job but is much too expensive at $150 (Amazon Germany - $120 directly from the manufacturer). I won't accept this answer because I think something much cheaper should exist. It does everything asked for in the question, plus balancing up to 6S and some other battery chemistries too and output is not just in the right range, but ...


3

Computer UPSs are optimized to provide high power levels for a short period of time, the idea being to bridge a brief flicker in the mains power, or let you shut down cleanly during an extended outage. At low power draws, they are quite inefficient, wasting much of the battery's power as heat. Your best bet is to build your own UPS from an inverter-charger ...


3

If you are looking for the best choice for paid money I would recommend: EVGA SuperNOVA 850 P2 - $160 on newegg.com Description: This PSU has Platinum certificate and it was made on Super Flower platform so it guarantees high quality of components. It is passive until load around 340W. It has avarage efficiency on low loads around 84.2 % and on normal ...


3

If you are looking for the best performance not looking at price of the PSU I would recommend: EVGA SuperNOVA 850 T2 - $220 on newegg.com Description: If there is no price limit the best avaliable PSU's have Titanium certificate like SuperNova T2. It was made on Super Flower platform so it guarantees high quality of components. It is passive until load ...


3

Right now on Newegg, which I am guessing is your retailer of choice, there are better options available. Corsair's PSUs are good, and like any good PSU, they aren't really going to betray you (though I have seen them fail, that was in an office environment that I don't really feel reflects on how they would perform in a home environment). However, their ...


3

A fully-wired PSU is simply a non-modular PSU, and comes with all power cables hard-wired. A semi-modular PSU has the essential cables hard wired and the other cables socketed. A (fully) modular PSU has all power cables socketed. To quote Overclockers: Whereas non-modular power supplies come with all possible cables already attached, a modular PSU comes ...


3

Nothing with more than 2 ports exists as far as I know. (2017-07) Even the chips to make it are limited to 2 ports as far as I can tell. Wanted this for a while myself for a group of pixels and other devices that are all type C. They are getting closer: Lifepowr has an indiegogo with 100W type c dual ports. https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/lifepowr-a3-...


3

Baseus GaN 120W PD charger would be the one to consider. https://a.aliexpress.com/_BPxnjT It doesn't exactly has 4 ports, but it has 3 ports that all support QC and some support PD. I have a cheaper 65W model, which can support 2 ports working in PD or QC mode simultaneously, but doesn't support QC on all ports at the same time, but I think this one is much ...


2

The Seasonic Platinum series seems to be good. The Seasonic site says it has a 92% power efficiency. It's also fanless, so it's super quiet. However, it is very expensive for a 400W PSU. However this seems to be one of the most efficient, if that is what you are looking for.


2

For a thorough and safe compilation I went to the good old 80plus.org. For now it seems the best at 100 W consumption are (those under 92 % struck), among the ATX at 500 W max or less and sorted by average: CFD KRPW-TI500W/94+ or Enhance ATX-1850: 93.89% (ATX12V, max 500 W, average 93.47%); Dell L240EPM-00: 92 % (SFF, max 240 W, average 92.45 %); Fujitsu ...


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