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39

Like the CODE keyboard, I will recommend the WASD Keyboards 87-key mechanical keyboard. The base cost is $145 USD, but it can get up to $185. Let's look at your requirements one by one. Requirements: Must play nice with my 2012 MacBook Pro This uses a standard USB connector with no special drivers. This will work with your MacBook. Must not slide around ...


24

CODE keyboards are, indeed, some of the best I've found. I run the CODE 104 MX Blue, and I've loved it. It doesn't slip (rubberized feet, and good weight). $145 (incidentally, all the CODE keyboards are well within your budget) Nice and clicky like a mechanical should be - but the "hail on a tin roof" is dampened so you don't get constant rattling (use MX ...


21

In my experience (new mechanical user): Advantages Key Rollover - Mechanical keyboards should support NKRO (infinite simultaneous key presses) over PS/2 and 6KRO (six simultaneous key presses not including four modifiers like Ctrl, etc., so 10 simultaneous) over USB*. Being able to press this many keys means the only limit to your typing speed is your ...


20

I have been using this keyboard for several years (I bought two, one for home and one for work): Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard. It works fine with my Macbook pros (I have used 2010 and 2015 with it) as well as Windows. There are pads which don't slip (rubber feet) $70 or so on Amazon currently US/QWERTY setup, with no numberpad (which adds a huge ...


17

It's really hard to find exact data about keys travel distance and force needed to actuate. But I would recommend you some keyboards which are good choices in my opinion. 1st option: We can start from Razer mechanical keyboards with orange switches they are a little better than Cherry switches if we talk about travel distance needed to actuation. We can ...


13

From your comments on the other answer, and my own experiences, (and much to my own suprise)... dude, get a dell. Or specifically the l1100/SK-8115. I'm a keyboard snob. I have a backlit mechanical keyboard that over the years has mellowed down to a very comfortable piece of equipment, which some day I will hand over to my nephew. Its a elegant weapon for ...


11

If you don't need the physical keys to change (and well, a keycap puller and maybe spare keys would fix that), you could get a remappable mechanical keyboard. I've got an old school Razer BlackWidow - now sold as the BlackWidow Classic, but many keyboards of this sort would have similar features. Has proper switches. Because of this, you can just pull and ...


10

If you're just coding and avoiding RSI, get a keyboard with scissor switches. This switch type is used in the famous ultra-thin Apple keyboard and most modern laptops. It's extremely quiet so you won't get annoyed, and its key feature is its low profile meaning you don't have to press keys down "really far." With a mechanical keyboard, most switch types ...


9

You should look into the Logitech K120 Keyboard. This keyboard meets all of your requirements, but none of your preferences. It costs $15 USD + shipping. It has a large font printed on the keys for maximum visibility. Every Logitech product that I have owned has lasted over 5 years. My mouse that just died made it almost to 7. Requirements: ✔ Price should ...


8

Your operating system such as Windows or Mac OS X should be able to remap the input of the keyboard to Dvorak, Colmak, or other national language layouts. You should not need any support for this from the keyboard hardware. By the way, transitioning to a standing desk may help with your back and slumping. Working with a good Pilates trainer helped me ...


8

I'd recommend the Logitech K750 Solar. I've had this keyboard for over a year and it's perfect. I have zero complaints. I'm very familiar with Apple's keyboards so the shift to this keyboard has been effortless. It's thin, and has flat keys. The layout is also designed for mass with the function keys having their appropriate icons. Specs: Solar Powered (...


8

The Anker® Bluetooth Ultra-Slim Keyboard is a very small, cheap, and light Bluetooth keyboard, and it seems to be a good fit for your needs. It has full sized keys, and retails for 16.00. It also comes in both black and white. You can buy one here. Another slightly more expensive option is the Jelly Comb Universal Back-lit keyboard. It retails for 20$, has ...


8

Coincidentally, Cherry has just released a new switch, the MX Silver (a.k.a. MX Speed), which has a much lower actuation point: Unfortunately, the travel distance is too quite long, I'm not sure why (comments are welcome if you know). I also don't know how much mm of rings one can add to reduce the travel distance. The MX Silver is used in Corsair ...


7

So, there is no keyboards with a dedicated "B" key on both sides so I found the next best thing. The Ergo Pro is fully separated, and has some good reviews. but what it has that you really need, an extra key to the left of the N key, on the right side. The reason this is important is because you can easily remap that key to send in a b. Map Any Key to ...


6

If your are into flat keyboards, I recommend the Cherry Stream. They just released a new revision with the 3.0. I'm using this keyboard for years and already bought it twice. I can't recall how long the first one lasted but it was at last 5 years with intensive use. I'm not sure how much it is in the US but in Germany you can get it for less than 20€, which ...


6

It's not quite just a keyboard, but the Logitech MK220 is probably the smallest big keyboard I've ever used (comes with a mouse). Battery life is measured in years and standard batteries allround. Its full sized, just dosen't waste any space at all, nice clear non-backlit keys. Works with Windows and Linux, and over wireless via a dongle. I think I paid ...


6

Look no further. Optimus Tactus. Zero travel distance and mere touch to activate. Plus on-the-fly reconfiguration of the layout, even quite thorough, with arbitrary key shape changes. I'm not entirely sure how practical it is for active use, but it definitely fits the bill. Unfortunately, availability might be poor - I'm not sure if it ever entered trade....


4

MX Blue switches are known to have the most tactile feedback and loudest click of Cherry's MX range. If you are using it for gaming (which from the razer I am guessing you are), you want to be looking at the MX Cherry Red Keyboards. These have light feedback and a quieter click, allowing for a much smoother game. There is a good answer explaning on here. ...


4

I've used a compact IOGEAR keyboard on an HTPC before. I was impressed with how comfortable it felt to hold. Product: IOGEAR Multimedia Keyboard (Model: GKM561R) This keyboard has the following features: Rubber grips on the sides Separate scroll wheel and track ball Mouse sensitivity adjustments Compact It does not have a charger though. It utilizes two ...


4

If you are willing to try a new keyboard layout Truly Ergonomic makes a mechanical keyboard that is structured oddly. It is suppose to be better for you than the standard keyboards (during long term use) and they have different key switch options. It should also be noted that this keyboard does not have a keypad, if you find yourself using the keypad a lot ...


4

First of all, I would make sure that you aren't circumventing any policies by using hardware rather than software, but I'll assume that the powers that be simply don't want you installing things on those laptops. It sounds like you are looking for an IP KVM or KVM over IP. The cost of such hardware may be more than you are hoping, but I think these ...


4

In this price range I would choose: CM Storm Devastator - LED Gaming Keyboard and Mouse Combo Bundle. It is available in Newegg shop in Blue/Red LED for $29.99 and in Green LED for $41.37. But if you can find additional funds I would recommend other keyboard and mouse: Keyboard: Gigabyte Force K7 which costs arond $50 Mouse: Roccat Lua which week ago I ...


4

The Arion Rapoo Black KX 5.8GHz Wireless Smart Backlight LED Built-in Lithium Battery Mechanical MX Keyboard - Black (85 USD) is mechanical, in addition to being flat (2mm travel distance, 50g actuation force). And they don't have any inclination, unlike too many other mechanical keyboards. Full specifications: Key Structure:Yellow mechanical key switches ...


4

This doesn't hit all of your checkboxes, but I like it quite a bit so I'll throw in a recommendation for an Anne Pro mechanical keyboard. I picked one up a few weeks ago because the robber dome boards at work were hurting my fingers. It's a pretty great board, but I'll go through your concerns so you have a decent rundown. For background, I've also got a K70 ...


3

Josh Spoors does a great explanation on the different switches, so I'm not going to do it again. But what I am going to do is to recommend you a product. Since the K70 RGB with Blue Switch is discontinued, there is another great product. Let me introduce you to the GSkill KM780 RGB with the Cherry MX Blue switch. GSkill is new to the keyboard market but is a ...


3

Finally, I opted for a different model, because it seems to have better support for Japanese language (which I also needed). However, for more general cases I think @Andy's answer is the best choice. I bought this Japanese Bluetooth wireless trackball keyboard: Miyoshi's TK-BT01


3

You want a KVM over IP device. Something similar to TRIPP LITE B055-001, would work (assuming, in this case, the server has PS/2 ports for the keyboard and mouse). This model is about $120. There are USB enabled ones as well, such as the StarTech SV5USBM, which has only one USB connection. Adding on more connectors raises the price from about $100 to ...


3

From what other people have told me, the Microsoft Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 is one of the best keyboards that they have bought. This is a full sized keyboard, so it has a number pad and will not be as portable as a smaller keyboard. It does have media keys (play/pause, next, previous, and mute) as well. There are a few additional features that this ...


3

I don't see a price range (and its a little pricy) but the microsoft universa1 foldable keyboard meets many of your requirements. Responsive keyboard. I.e. soft keys aren't going to suit. Its chicklet style, and the same sort of switches as the MS surface typing keyboard. Tested has a mini review that suggests it has a decent amount of travel Full/large ...


3

iClever keyboard seems to fit your requirements. Number row is included. To use with Android you just have to choose Fn + Q. It is lightweight (0.39lbs =~ 176.9 grams) and tri-folding which makes it perfect for travel (size: 145mm x 95mm x 15mm). To sum up: compact size keyboard spacing is not cramped aluminum body rubber feet on the bottom (for anti-...


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