Hot answers tagged

4

I'm looking for something similar to this myself; currently I'm using a CHIP from NextThingCo; you'd have to write the software yourself for what you want, but it runs standard linux. Wi-Fi connection CHIP can connect to two wifi networks (or provide one). There's no ethernet, however. Audio output CHIP has a TRRS jack Push button to config wireless ...


3

Your best bet is one of the Rasbperry PI 2 or 3 is $35 The PI 3 does actually have built-in wifi, but no WPS button or activity leds. They both have a RJ45 for hard wiring with activity leds. You need a 5V adapter,SD card, USB wifi adapter and shipping and handling will bring the cost up a bit more. Give up on the WPS and wifi activity leds and save $10-$...


2

The thing you you are looking for is called a Linear Actuator http://amzn.to/2uWRIjV Depending on the strength of linear actuator you get, you might not even need a latch. You can have the Arduino power the linear actuator until it senses the door fully closed or open. When it is not powered it will hold its position.


2

I accidentally found the answer to my own question. What I am looking for suddenly happened to appear in my Amazon recommendations (even though I haven't searched for anything like this on Amazon), and found you can find a lot of electric door locks by searching "open frame type solenoid" including this one, for example.


2

As you have shown an Arduino type device in your photo, you may want to consider to explore the world of Arduino controlled PID devices. I have a stand-alone device which consists of a thermocouple wired to the PID and a solid state relay which is used to turn a heater on and off based on the temperature settings within the PID The manual method requires ...


2

From what you have asked, It looks quite straightforward to me so I am assuming that you are new to controllers. Apologies otherwise. What you need to do is: Serially connect both devices (I2C/SPI). Program ESP32 to send a command/message serially to Arduino to switch on/off the fan relay based on your temperature thresholds. Program the Arduino to switch ...


2

When I hear you ask for a module, I think of an Arduino "Shield" but you dont need one of these. You can connect what you need directly to the board, but it will be easier if you use a breadboard. There is a really good paper here that describes the measurement process and even shows the low-pass amplifier they used to read from the pressure sensor. You ...


1

AMG8833 is a popular thermal camera which has an accuracy of 2.5 °C (4.5 °F). The benefit is that it's commonly used, and has a pretty decent support. The drawback is its tiny resolution, 8×8 pixels only. It costs around $40. MLX90640 is another, although less popular, choice, with its increased resolution of 32×24 pixels and an accuracy of 1.5 °C. You can ...


1

Instead of choosing an Arduino board, use an ESP8266 variant which natively supports Arduino sketches. You can use a relay or directly connect a button to the I/O pins and detect whenever a button is triggered - triggering the server to push the timestamp to a database, increasing the count of the stomp in the database. Instead of writing a PHP application. ...


1

There are microcomputers I suggested in another similar question, and unless your cam needs a specific connector you can choose from those: UP Core - https://up-shop.org/up-core/271-up-core.html 1-4 GB RAM, 16-64 GB eMMC storage, Intel Atom X5 Z8350, 99$USD for cheapest options ASUS Computer Stick VivoStick - https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?...


1

I used "six axis joystick with rotation" as the search terms and came up with an open-source resource from the UNMND web site. It appeals to me because I like to build stuff and this one is very much a home-build type of project. I have a 3dconnexion SpacePilot Pro which has the requirements you describe, but it is fairly expensive and may not necessarily ...


1

Not Bluetooth, but wifi, therefore it qualifies for "other wireless technology, the "aiball" camera comes in as a candidate. Available on Amazon, as well as a few other locations, it doesn't come in with high praises via the reviews. Here's the better part of this answer. Once you visit the Amazon link, you see other small wireless cameras that may give you ...


1

The Raspberry Pi Zero W It's $10, comes with Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi onboard, and can be very easily set for use with an I2C sensor. Under full load it draws a only 1.2W, but has enough horses to keep pace. Best of all, it has a massive community backing it, including a StackExchange community! The biggest drawback comes in the niche I/O choices compared to ...


1

Recommendations There are many different mesh networks I have seen being set up with the Arduino. Here I name just a few of the common ones. Pinoccio According to the website, Field Scouts talk to each other using a mesh network (called a Troop), using an extremely low-power radio. This makes them 14 times more efficient than standard WiFi devices. ...


1

Using 3 I/O, you can only charlieplex 6 LEDs. The board would require an I/O expander, which would take up space limiting the area you could place LEDs. However, a very functional, full color matrix LED board is available at a reasonable price from Adafruit: the Adafruit NeoPixel Shield. It's listed for under $30 right now, and requires only one digital ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible