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Is there a range extender that is using ethernet rather than WiFi for incoming network.

Meaning, I want my range extender to have an input ethernet port (rather than output), so that I'll connect it to the ethernet port on the wall.

All the range extender I could find were transforming WiFi to WiFi or WiFi to ethernet, and I'm looking for ethernet to WiFi.

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    What you are looking for is probably a router with Ethernet bridging capability or a eWAN port, or whatever. – timuzhti Nov 17 '16 at 8:34
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    What else are you looking for other than "ethernet to WiFi"? Can't you just setup another router? – Zukaberg Nov 17 '16 at 15:19
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    So do you want to extend your wifi? or you want to have ethernet at the edge of your wifi network? – Ali Nov 17 '16 at 17:20
  • router >> length of Cat 6 >> wireless router. That should work. – NZKshatriya Nov 19 '16 at 5:00
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    @Ali, I want to extend my wif. – danieln Nov 20 '16 at 7:14
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You can use normal WiFi Access Point routers for this.

The one I use is the Foscam N300. It works great for both ends of this application.

Just don't use the WAN ports unless you also intend to create a subnet.

-- Unless it has built-in bridging that actually works. I have tried several brands that claim to work but in practice they get confused.

If it doesn't have bridging, or if it doesn't work, then set it up as a normal AP and just plug into a LAN port on them, which is always internally bridged to its WiFi.

The router will think it has no WAN, but it should work for you.

If you use DHCP, make sure there is only one DHCP server on the entire subnet.

Or, as I do, just shut them all off and use static IPs, with the gateway address set to the closest router to the ISP.

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