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I want to replace an ASUS RT-AC1200G+ router. Currently, it is supporting around 20 wireless devices in my office. I am looking to support more than 50 wireless devices in my office in the near future.

Is there a good metric to look at for wireless routers to determine what is the maximum number of concurrent users it can support? Or is there an assumed limit of "X" number of devices regardless of brand and model?

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    The only thing I can think of (assuming your office is no larger than a decent-sized US home) is the download/upload speed that would hinder usage. This wouldn't cap the number of devices on the network, but limit the speed of those devices. – Trevor Hummer Mar 25 at 3:01
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    @K7AAY The topology is a single floor office, about 90 square metres (~960 square feet?), furthest point to be is about 15 metres, internally, at most will cross one dry wall in any directions. – amsga Mar 25 at 4:07
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    @TrevorHummer, I apologize in advance if I am mistaken. Do you mean, simplistically speaking, something like an AC1300 device for 10 devices would be around 100Mbps per device due to simple division? – amsga Mar 25 at 4:10
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    This is slightly complicated in my opinion. The device pulls as much data as the network allows (how much is allowed is very complicated, due to the data traveling through many servers and networks before it reaches your device). If everyone is downloading a large file from a server or a website, I think that 100Mbps number is correct on paper. In reality, each device takes as much data as it needs. Someone, PLEASE correct me if I am wrong. – Trevor Hummer Mar 25 at 4:27
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There's no standard assumption for the number of users, for that's dependent on the processing power of the router and many other factors. This is a complex subject which is why there are WiFi industry certifications for admins.

Given your use case of 50+ users in an office with at most one gypsum wall, I believe a more powerful router with more processing power than the Broadcom BCM47189 and BCM43217 processors in your existing ASUS router would be desirable. Also, a new router should conform to the new WiFi 6 802.11ax standard, and be capable of security with WPA2, WPA3, and 802.1X WPA Enterprise with a RADIUS Server. The latter may not be desirable now, but if you find later on you need that, you're prepared.

You can expand the network coverage with additional Wireless Access Points, or another router, later if you need to.

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  • I'd agree with what you're suggesting – Trevor Hummer Mar 25 at 16:05
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    In some cases it makes sense to consider multiple access points and a separate router too. The WiFi radio and the router are entirely separate systems that are usually built together in home-use products, but in larger enterprise networks it makes more sense to have a high end wired router connected to several WiFi access points. – Romen Mar 25 at 17:19
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    I'd add that in WiFi 6 the access point can impose time slots on clients, significantly reducing collisions in congested environments (such as the office in question). AFAIK part of design goals for WiFi 6 was to improve this exact scenario. – Jan Dorniak Mar 28 at 16:54

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