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I'm search for a monitor that can handle an input signal of 4k at 60fps, over its HDMI input.

I've found the Dell Ultrasharp U3219Q that have a HDMI port. As you can see in its online manual, page 14 in the table :

Ports and connectors : 1 x DisplayPort version 1.4 (HDCP 2.2)• 1 x HDMI port version 2.0 (HDCP 2.2)

But, in page 16, again in the table :

Electrical specifications

Video input signals : HDMI 2.0*/DisplayPort 1.4**, 600 mV for each differential line, 100 ohm input impedance per differential pair

...

  • Not supporting HDMI 2.0 optional specification, including HDMI Ethernet Channel (HEC), Audio Return Channel (ARC), standard for 3D format and resolutions, and standard for 4K digital cinema resolution. ** HDR is supported, but HBR3 is not supported; DP 1.2 is supported.

So, this is an HDMI 2.0 input port, but it doesn't support HDMI 2.0 specification ? What am I supposed to understand there ?

Does anyone have this monitor and can attest if this port allows or not a 4k@60 input signal ?

Thank you !

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Can the HDMI input of the Dell monitor U3219Q handle a 4k@60fps input signal?

Yes.

The footnotes on that page of the manual can be rephrased like this:

Supports HDMI 2.0, but without optional specifications ... such as 4K digital cinema resolution (4096 x 2160).

If you look at the page right above "Electrical Specifications" you can see that the monitor does support 3840 x 2160 @ 60hz as long as the video device supports HDMI 2.0.


And another note on 4K terminology:

3840 x 2160 and 4096 x 2160 are both casually called "4K" but to avoid ambiguity the former is referred to as "UHD". The Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI) have used "4K" for their 4096 x 2160 resolution too, so it is more specific to refer to that as "DCI 4K" or "Cinematic 4K", which is what Dell has done in your manual.

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  • That's clear :) Thank you – Thaledric Sep 5 '19 at 19:53

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