We're preparing an exhibition and I'd like to know what are the chances of interference between individual exhibitors.

I know that:

Vive Pro can use up to 16 Base 2.0 stations

Vive Pro can use Base 1.0 stations

Vive can't use Base 2.0 stations

Vive can only use 2 Base 1.0 stations - if it catches a signal from a third one, nuclear meltdown ensues.

I would like to know what happens when:

Vive Pro that is tracked by Base 2.0 stations accidentally detects signal from Base 1.0 station

Vive is that is tracked by Base 1.0 stations in the signal of Base 2.0 station - I know it can's use their signal, but can it cause interference?

Any experience?

put on hold as off-topic by Bennett Yeo, Mark, Alpha3031, Cfinley yesterday

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  • It would help if you explained how this signal is propagated (e.g., WiFi, BlueTooth, etc.) This would show you've put some effort into finding the answer before asking us about it. – Alex Nov 9 at 4:45
  • It's an infrared signal with a Bluetooth station-to-station communication. The functionality is however driven by the firmware, which is, understandably, proprietary. – Adam Streck Nov 9 at 17:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't have live experience with Vive. However, the Vive FAQ says,

Important: Use only the same version of base stations together. Different base station versions are not interchangeable.

In other words, if Vive Pro accidentally detects the signal from a Base 1.0 station, it will cause significant interference. The reason for that is, that the IR method of communication prevents Vive from locking on to a signal (which would be possible for it to do if the communication were entirely in BlueTooth). Therefore, when another signal of the same frequency comes in, it will cause a disruption.

That being said, it's worthwhile to keep in mind that since IR is a more-or-less unidirectional signal, you still should be able to make it work if you are very careful to make sure that the signals from the two base versions do not intersect. Theoretically anyways. In practice, as I said, I never used Vive before, so it might be harder than it seems.

Let me know if this doesn't answer your question fully.

p.s., in the future, such questions belong on SuperUser.

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