added 122 characters in body
Source Link
K7AAY
  • 1.6k
  • 5
  • 24

So, you're in Suid-Afrika. Get a lot of lightning?

I did, growing up in Zap Central, the lightning capital of the United States, with > 90 days/year where you could depend on a lightning strike within a mile. The county was also flat and sub-tropical; the highest ground was five meters above mean high tide.

The highest building in the entire county at the time (the largest county east of the Mississippi, I might add) was the administration building of the county government complex, where the county's mainframe was. LOTS of lightning, lots of power outages, many extended. Oh, and did I mention hurricanes?

So, the axle of a motor-generator set was attached to a heavy flywheel. The motor spun the flywheel and the axle, the generator turned the rotation into clean steady power. When (not if, but when) the power fails, the flywheel would run until a diesel genny could be started to pick up the load.

No need for inverters, rectifiers, or batteries, which are all failure-prone and high maintenance. It was also the kind of thing a shade-tree mechanic could keep running easily.

So, you're in Suid-Afrika. Get a lot of lightning?

I did, growing up in Zap Central, the lightning capital of the United States, with > 90 days/year where you could depend on a lightning strike within a mile. The county was also flat and sub-tropical; the highest ground was five meters above mean high tide.

The highest building at the time was the administration building of the county government complex, where the mainframe was. LOTS of lightning, lots of power outages, many extended.

So, the axle of a motor-generator set was attached to a heavy flywheel. The motor spun the flywheel and the axle, the generator turned the rotation into clean steady power. When (not if, but when) the power fails, the flywheel would run until a diesel genny could be started to pick up the load.

No need for inverters, rectifiers, or batteries, which are all failure-prone and high maintenance. It was also the kind of thing a shade-tree mechanic could keep running easily.

So, you're in Suid-Afrika. Get a lot of lightning?

I did, growing up in Zap Central, the lightning capital of the United States, with > 90 days/year where you could depend on a lightning strike within a mile. The county was also flat and sub-tropical; the highest ground was five meters above mean high tide.

The highest building in the entire county at the time (the largest county east of the Mississippi, I might add) was the administration building of the county government complex, where the county's mainframe was. LOTS of lightning, lots of power outages, many extended. Oh, and did I mention hurricanes?

So, the axle of a motor-generator set was attached to a heavy flywheel. The motor spun the flywheel and the axle, the generator turned the rotation into clean steady power. When (not if, but when) the power fails, the flywheel would run until a diesel genny could be started to pick up the load.

No need for inverters, rectifiers, or batteries, which are all failure-prone and high maintenance. It was also the kind of thing a shade-tree mechanic could keep running easily.

Source Link
K7AAY
  • 1.6k
  • 5
  • 24

So, you're in Suid-Afrika. Get a lot of lightning?

I did, growing up in Zap Central, the lightning capital of the United States, with > 90 days/year where you could depend on a lightning strike within a mile. The county was also flat and sub-tropical; the highest ground was five meters above mean high tide.

The highest building at the time was the administration building of the county government complex, where the mainframe was. LOTS of lightning, lots of power outages, many extended.

So, the axle of a motor-generator set was attached to a heavy flywheel. The motor spun the flywheel and the axle, the generator turned the rotation into clean steady power. When (not if, but when) the power fails, the flywheel would run until a diesel genny could be started to pick up the load.

No need for inverters, rectifiers, or batteries, which are all failure-prone and high maintenance. It was also the kind of thing a shade-tree mechanic could keep running easily.